Author Archives: scratchinpractice

How Do You Scaffold Peer Learning? By Natalie Rusk When we ask young people what motivates their participation on Scratch, they often emphasize the importance of their friends and other peers. Whether in person or online, peers motivate creative learning by sharing ideas, collaborating on projects, offering help, providing encouragement, and creating a sense of […]

Monthly Introduction (Peer Learning) In this video, Eric and Alexa introduce this month’s theme, Peer Learning. How do you support peer learning with Scratch? Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook using the hashtag #scratchinpractice. You can also add a comment below!

There’s More Than One Way to Code a Cat By Natalie Rusk “How do I make my character jump?” a student asks while coding a project in Scratch. Before responding, I find it’s helpful to ask what they have in mind, so they can think aloud about the process. Talking out their idea is often […]

Monthly Introduction (Many Paths, Many Styles) In this video, My and Zoë introduce this month’s theme, Many Paths, Many Styles. How do you engage learners with diverse interests and backgrounds with Scratch? Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook using the hashtag #scratchinpractice. You can also add a comment below!

Creative Connections in Science, Social Studies, Language Arts, and More By Natalie Rusk Since our team first launched Scratch, we’ve been excited to see students creating interactive projects to explore and express ideas spanning a wide range of subjects. Sometimes a whole class will make projects around a topic, such as making games about ancient […]

Monthly Introduction (Curriculum Connections) In this video, Champika and Sean introduce this month’s theme, Curriculum Connections. How do you connect Scratch to topics? We’d love to hear from you! Please comment below, and/or share on social media using the hashtag #scratchinpractice.

Start with Exploration, Not Explanation By Natalie Rusk When I’ve asked educators what advice they would offer to someone new to Scratch, the most common advice I’ve heard is, “Dive in!” They encourage students (and fellow educators) to start exploring Scratch, try it out, and learn as they go. As Scratch is introduced into more […]